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Tuesday, March 07, 2006

Planning a Bicentennial

As the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission seeks to raise $100 million in private donations, we're starting to get a glimpse of what may be in store for Lincoln's 200th birthday bash. These are in addition to events to be held by states, municipalities, and organizations:

The highlight will be a nationally televised rededication of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington on Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12, 2009, featuring fireworks, music and a presidential address. The event, estimated to cost $2.5 million, is meant to stimulate national discussion on equality, opportunity, race and race relations.

We can't help but wonder who will do the honors of the presidential address.

The bicentennial activities might include at least three traveling Lincoln exhibits, including one led by the Library of Congress that would feature significant Lincoln writings and artifacts with scheduled stops in Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and possibly Atlanta.

We're thinking they should put the exhibits on wheels and make frequent stops.

The public may be able to participate in a range of other ways, from town hall meetings on race and racism to a coast-to-coast antique car parade on what used to be the Lincoln Highway.

We're all over a national discussion on race and racism. Let's start now. And, we love the Lincoln Highway, but only wish Abe could have known the joys of driving it on a sunny Sunday afternoon.

To create a lasting tribute to Lincoln on the occasion of the bicentennial, commissioners hope to create a sculpture garden in Washington, with castings of great Lincoln statues and possibly a newly commissioned one. The commission also has endorsed a proposal by the nonprofit group, Heritage Preservation, to restore existing outdoor Lincoln sculptures around the country. Plans also call for the Gettysburg Address to be translated into 200 languages.

Excellent.

The bicentennial activities also will have a strong educational component, ranging from an international conference on slavery to Lincoln-themed lesson plans for kindergarten to high school students. The lesson plans are scheduled to be available on the commission's Web site, www.lincoln200.gov, later this spring. Scholastic Inc. plans to feature Lincoln books in school book fairs around the country in 2009.

More excellent.

The money men, a/k/a Lincoln cabinet, so far include Mario Cuomo (New York Gov. and Lincoln author), Terrance McDermott (former head of the National Association of Realtors), Dennis Swanson (Fox TV, and former Springfieldian), and Roger Hertog (Alliance Capital Management L.P.).

While we're confident the cabinet knows it's way around a good fund raiser, we're itching with anticipation to see how they're going to pull this one off.

Source: Dori Meinert,Copley News Service (Planners seek $100 million for Lincoln bicentennial).

Posted by Marie at March 7, 2006 9:51 PM

Comments

Who will do the presidential address honors?

Feb. 12, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President for Life Richard B. Cheney declared today that he will honor the legacy of President Abraham Lincoln by "fighting the enemy within" and suspending writs of habeas corpus for the duration of the Global War on Terror.

In a nationally televised address originally intended as a centerpiece to the nation's celebration of the Lincoln Bicentennial, Cheney said the controversial step has been made necessary by "unchecked lawlessness and criminality" during protests of his order to temporarily dissolve Congress following his inauguration Jan. 20.

"Just as Lincoln met the national emergency that threatened the Union when he took office, so we must respond sternly to those who would hide behind the cloak of democratic dissent as they steer us toward dark and destruction," President Cheney said.

Posted by: Dan at March 8, 2006 1:43 PM

I guess that was overly bleak, huh? (Or inane. Of the two, I'll take bleak.)

Posted by: Dan at March 9, 2006 6:20 PM

Definiely not inane. The thought of Cheney still in office in 2009 is a little bleak, perhaps. A bright spot would be a Cheney retirement after the November elections? Of course, the alternative could be bleaker.

Posted by: Marie at March 9, 2006 7:04 PM

Definiely not inane. The thought of Cheney still in office in 2009 is a little bleak, perhaps. A bright spot would be a Cheney retirement after the November elections? Of course, the alternative could be bleaker.

Posted by: Marie at March 9, 2006 7:15 PM

Definiely not inane. The thought of Cheney still in office in 2009 is a little bleak, perhaps. A bright spot would be a Cheney retirement after the November elections? Of course, the alternative could be bleaker.

Posted by: Marie at March 9, 2006 7:21 PM

Definiely not inane. The thought of Cheney still in office in 2009 is a little bleak, perhaps. A bright spot would be a Cheney retirement after the November elections? Of course, the alternative could be bleaker.

Posted by: Marie at March 9, 2006 7:23 PM

Something is wrong with my database server.

Posted by: Marie at March 9, 2006 7:43 PM