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Sunday, May 26, 2013

Three things

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I'm not sure how long this thing has been sitting outside, but I found it right after a major downpour.

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All the necessities.

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Arkansas.

* Earthquake swarm defined.

* Earthquakes in the Central U.S. (and beyond, because I see New York and West Virginia in there) for the last six months.

* One blogger is saying the Arkansas earthquakes are related to fracking. If so, someone should explain how this is good for Earth, or at least not harming it.

* Grist: What the frack do we know? Not much, it turns out.

* We are in the middle of it, as evidenced by recent dueling op-eds:

* Fifth arrest during third day of fracking sit-in.

* Like it or not, fracking is coming to Illinois, mostly Southern Illinois:

Thousands of landowners Downstate have sold their rights to drill for oil and natural gas for $50 to $350 per acre, plus a cut of the profits. The drilling technique uses pressurized sand, water and chemicals to crack open layers of rock that trap such fuels hundreds or thousands of feet below ground. The stampede to unleash such fuels has been compared to the Gold Rush of the 1840s.

* AP: Scenic, struggling southern Illinois braces for fracking rush:

The Pope County Board of Commissioners recently voted to support a 2-year drilling moratorium; bills filed in the Illinois House and Senate calling for a drilling delay have gotten little support.
"We need jobs," says board Chairman Larry Richards. "But will they just bring their own people in, tear our county up, destroy it and then pack up and leave us with a mess?"
Even so, many locals have leased land to oil companies, regarding it as a quick infusion of cash - a onetime payment of about $50 per acre - though they'll receive royalties if oil production is successful.
"I don't care whether I get (a well) or not," says 69-year-old Johnson County farmer Thomas Trover, who leased more than 1,300 acres to a Kansas oil company. "I got my $60,000."

And that is what it's all about.

* Death, taxes and trouble. Marvin.....

Posted by Marie at May 26, 2013 9:06 PM